Marketing New Year’s Resolutions to Keep in 2019


  • When you reach out to blogs and influencers, don’t think of it as a one-off opportunity, but rather as the first step in a potentially long-term, value-creating partnership.
  • Become a part of your client’s team rather than someone they occasionally reach out to.
  • In both technical and content campaigns, don’t just cast a wide net, but rather aim to reach people who will actually engage with the brand.
  • Share data with your freelance writers so they can see the impact of their content and better understand the relationship between what they write and how users behave.

It’s that time of year again. While you’re breaking out the bullet journals, vision boards, Power Points, or whatever holds you accountable through the transition to the New Year, we’ve got you covered in the marketing department with some choice New Year’s resolutions. Below, check out some of our team members’ goals for a stellar 2019.

Jason, Link Building: Build relationships, not links.

In other words, focus on value rather than links. It’s easy to treat link building outreach as a means to an end, but this is a somewhat backwards approach. If instead you strive for mutually beneficial relationships that provide lasting value to all parties, the links will come naturally. (If you build it, they will come!)

Join blogger groups, interact with community influencers, and establish yourself as a valuable player in those circles. When you reach out to blogs and influencers, don’t think of it as a one-off opportunity, but rather as the first step in a potentially long-term, value-creating partnership.

Mariah, Content: Be flexible with word count.

Tailoring content to user intent means avoiding a one-size-fits-all approach – including length.

Data can be a great tool in determining optimal word counts per content type and industry. But at the end of the day, letting writers come to a length that feels natural for the subject will lead to better, more reader-friendly content.

David, Technical: Integrate yourself with cross-departmental objectives.

As Google continues to fine-tune search results in accordance with context and user intent, it’s more important than ever to nix cookie-cutter technical strategies. Rather than checking boxes off a list of technical improvements, aim to prioritize updates that will have the greatest impact on your company’s audience. This will often mean aligning yourselves with cross-departmental efforts to synthesize the overall marketing strategy.

Become a part of your client’s team rather than someone they occasionally reach out to. By establishing a seat at the (conference) table, you can build relationships and better communicate with each department, using business objectives to ultimately stage a more vertical-specific campaign.

Mauricio, Strategy: Focus on audiences rather than traffic.

If you’re noticing a running theme for 2019 resolutions, it’s orienting strategy toward your vertical’s audience. In this case, make sure you’re targeting an audience you know you can serve.

Traffic that doesn’t meaningfully engage with your brand – or more importantly, doesn’t lead to conversions – isn’t useful. In both technical and content campaigns, don’t just cast a wide net, but rather aim concentrated marketing efforts to reach people who will engage with the brand.

One way to keep this resolution is to focus CRO efforts on feedback from real audiences. As noted by Forbes, focus groups are not universally loved in marketing circles – but we’re firm believers that pairing data analysis with qualitative feedback can give you a fuller picture of an audience’s perceptions.

Stephanie, Content: Keep your writing team updated on what value their content provides.

Communication is the life’s blood of the relationship between marketing managers and content creators, but this goes beyond comprehensive creative briefs.

Ideally, great content leads to great results – and the data should show it. Share this data with your writers (even if they’re freelance!) so they can see the impact their content makes, better understand the relationship between what they write and how users behave, and continue to grow as not only writers, but valuable members of your team.

Aaron, Paid: Fully utilize search terms reports for new long-tail keywords.

When it comes to paid marketing, there’s no shame in chasing long-tail keywords.

When using search match types to optimize SEM campaigns for specificity and scale, don’t tie yourself down to only “exact match” reports. By including other match types – such as “related keywords” – you get the opportunity to see additional (and possibly more relevant) keywords appearing in users’ searches.

For example, if we are bidding on the keyword “shoe store,” we’d do well to bid on a user that searches for “best running shoe store near me.” Knowing that longer keyword and adding it to our campaign should potentially get a lower cost-per-click and a higher click-through rate because we are rewarded in ad auctions by being closer to a user’s actual search. Broadening your search term match horizons can can fast-track campaigns to an overall more relevant online presence.

New Year’s resolutions can create a lot of pressure, but they don’t have to. Need some moral support when it comes to bringing your marketing campaign into 2019? We don’t just have the goals, we’ve got the tools and drive to meet them – contact us to find out how.

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